With the next generation of GPU seemingly right around the corner, Nvidia is primed for the release of new architecture, and possibly a new series of GDDR for the GTX 1180/2000 Series GPU. So what’s in the box? Let’s do the math together.

Based roughly on the transition from the GTX 980 to the GTX 1080, and in coupling with leaks ahead of Nvidia’s expected announcement for the 1180 series, we’ve compiled the raw numbers to break down what the GTX 1180 series of graphics cards could actually perform like in a real-world setting. Based on a new 12nm architecture set to release in 2018, reports suggest that Nvidia will be cramming bigger Die into the 1180 series cards this time around to pump out higher performance chips than ever.

This upgrade to performance will relate to a minimum of 140% more processing hardware occupying the same space, and on a larger die, translating to 160% of today’s standard GTX 1080 performance – about 11% faster than the latest GTX Titan XP. Have a look at the preliminary data we picked up from the leak and the math behind it below:

Cores

980 – 2048 CUDA Cores
1080 – 2560 CUDA Cores (125% vs 980)
1180 – 3584 CUDA Cores (140% vs 1080)

Texture Mapping Units

980 – 128
1080 – 160 (125% vs 980)
1180 – 224 (140% vs 1080)

Bandwidth

980 – 224.3 GB/s Memory Bandwidth
1080 – 320 GB/s Memory Bandwidth (143% vs 980)
1180 – 512 GB/s Memory Bandwidth (160% vs 1080)

Memory Speed

980 – 7010 MHz
1080 – 10000 MHz (143% vs 980)
1180 – 16000 MHz (160% vs 1080)

FP32 Performance

980 – ~5 TFLOPS
1080 – ~8.9 TFLOPS (178% vs 980)
1180 – ~13 TFLOPS (146% vs 1080)

Architecture

980 – 28 nm
1080 – 16 nm (43% smaller per die vs 980)
1180 – 12 nm (25% smaller per die vs 1080)

Estimated FPS In-Game*

980 – 91.3 FPS
1080 – 122.1 FPS (133% vs 980)
1180 – 184 FPS (151% vs 1080)

*Calculated based on hardware requirements for Dirt 3 at 2560×1440 resolution

All things considered, the release of the GTX 980 series of cards launched less than two years after the GTX 1080 series. Given that fact, the GTX 1180 series is overdue for an announcement. This neither solidifies or invalidates the leaked data we’ve got here, but given that the launch is about the same amount of time vs. performance changes, it makes sense that Nvidia is looking to update as soon as possible. Look out for the official confirmation of this data from Nvidia coming as early as August 20th at the Hot Chips 30 [pictured below].